Pharmacology Suffixes: Antibiotics

Pharmacology Suffixes: Antibiotics

Learning the pharmacology is by far one of the areas that many nurse graduates have the most about of trouble with. In the table below,  I describe the pharmacology suffixes for antibiotics.

Name

Suffix/Prefix

Rationale

Side Effects

Aminoglycosides

Mycin

Treats bacterial infections

Ototoxicity and flank pain

Antimicrobials

Dazole

Treats bacterial and skin infections

Skin irritation and dryness

Cephalosporins

Cef/cepha

Treats bacterial infections

Rash and stomach cramps

Fluoroquinolones

Quin

Treats bacterial infections

Nausea and anaphylaxis

Penicillins

cillin

Treats bacterial infections

Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea

Sulfonamides

Sulfa

Treats bacterial infections

Steven Johnson syndrome

Tetraclycines

Cycline

Treats bacterial infections

Toxicity in pregnancy, discolors teeth

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There are about 7 types of antibiotics to know broken down into their classifications. Antibiotics treat bacterial infections such as pneumonia.

Some important key facts

  • Aminoglycosides such as vancomycin can be extremely toxic especially with elderly patients or patients with poor renal function. As a result, when patients are on this medication, blood levels need to also be drawn, usually every third dose to monitor for toxicity.

  • When patients come initially into the hospital treatment must be aggressive so patients will receive these antibiotics usually through IVPB and must be administered at the appropriate rate.

  • Tetraclycines can have negative side effects in the fetus for pregnant mothers so it’s important that women are not pregnant during the time of administration.

  • There is also a direct type of medication that doesn’t treat bacterial infections but treats viral infections such as tuberculosis which are called antivirals. These medications have a “vir” prefix/suffix ending.

  • The effectivity of the antibiotics is monitored by changes in WBC and temperature control.

  • Quinolones and cephalosporins are normally used to treat Legionnaire’s disease.

 

 

 

 

 

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